Proposals are being invited for the 15th Australasian Urban History / Planning History conference to be held in Launceston, Tasmania from 5-7 February 2020

Edge Conditions: Invented Peripheries, Hidden Centres

Conference theme:  Australia is a nation of ‘coast-huggers’, with the vast bulk of its population residing within 50km of the sea. The geographical centre of the continent constitutes its demographic periphery. This apparent inversion, in which an edge condition fosters fecundity and the centre is displaced to a margin, neatly encapsulates the thematic focus for the 2020 iteration the Urban History Planning History conference. To be held in Launceston, Tasmania, a regional town within an entire state classified as ‘regional’ – a periphery of a periphery – the conference aims to explore the formation, conditions and potentials of edges, margins, peripheries and islands in illuminating the understanding of cities and urban phenomena. This thematic is open to both literal and metaphorical readings. The ‘edge conditions’ of the title may be understood in geographic, demographic, historical, spatial, disciplinary, or methodological terms. Geographically inspired papers may focus on peri-urban zones or suburbia, settlement and mobility patterns mediating edges and centres, forgotten projects or abandoned sites. Demographic approaches may highlight the experience and environments of marginalised groups, ethnic or religious minorities, indigenous or migrant communities. Edge conditions in historical terms may suggest thresholds or ‘tipping points’ associated with technological, institutional, or environmental change. Spatial and architecturally-oriented studies may consider how edge conditions at various scales may operate variously as transitional or liminal spaces, ‘terrains vague’, contact zones, public spaces, or delineations of culture and identity. Consideration of edge conditions in disciplinary and methodological terms invites productive engagements with alternate ways of researching the shaping of cities, whether through landscape studies or land economics; actor-network theory or action research.

Please note: Submissions on all other aspects of urban and planning history in Australia and New Zealand will also be welcomed.

In the interests of an agile process and a generative gathering, and taking a view of the value of conferences as spaces for developing work-in-progress, we are adopting a simple single-stage review process, reviewing and selecting proposals based on submitted elaborated abstracts of up to 600 words. Full papers and/or presentations will not be further reviewed prior to the conference.

We encourage work from doctoral candidates, early-career researchers, local historians, independent scholars, in addition to established and emerging academics from across the Australasian region.

We invite proposals for both individual presentations and grouped thematic panels of up to four presenters. Proposals for roundtables are also welcomed, and will be assessed on their merits.

Key Dates:

1 Nov 2019 Abstract submissions

15 Nov 2019 Abstract acceptances notified

24 Jan 2020 Paper/presentation materials submitted (for inclusion in conference pack)

Organising Committee:   David Beynon, Helen Norrie, Stefan Petrow, Andrew Steen, and Julian Worrall

Enquiries: EOIs and enquiries may be made to the conference email address[email protected]

A conference webpage will be established at www.utas.edu.au/urban-history-planning-history- conference-2020

Please also see PDF for further information

Image by bluewaterscottage10 from Pixabay