Members

Members of the Australian and New Zealand Environmental History Network have diverse interests in environmental history and are found all over the world. Some are independent scholars and writers; others work within universities, government, museums and private enterprise.

Here we are building a list of member profiles, to facilitate networking and collaboration among our diverse and growing membership, and enable non-members looking for environmental history expertise to locate it. We encourage everyone who subscribes to our newsletter to email us with a brief profile (to 70 words) and photo (preferably around 150×133 pixels) for inclusion here.

You can also find a regular round-up of member publications here.

 

Member profiles

James Beattie is an environmental, garden and world historian whose work focuses on the Asia-Pacific region, mostly over the last 200 years. He is especially interested in cross-cultural exchanges occasioned by British imperialism, and the nexus between environment, gardens, health, science and art. He is founding editor of International Review of Environmental History, and co-edits the book series, Palgrave Studies in World Environmental History. http://www.victoria.ac.nz/science/about/staff/james-beattie
Johanna Conterio is a Lecturer in Modern European and International History at Flinders University, specialising in Modern Russia. Her research interests include urban environmental history; environment and health; nature conservation; maritime history, particularly the history of the Black Sea; agriculture, and food culture. She is moving into her second project into global history. http://flinders.academia.edu/JohannaConterio
Nancy Cushing is a Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Newcastle, teaching and researching in environmental history. Her particular research interests lie at the intersection of human-animal relations and food studies, and in the environmental history of Newcastle, the subject of her 2015 book with Howard Bridgman, Smoky City. She was convenor of the AHA Green Stream in 2016 and 2017 and chairs the interim committee of the EHN. http://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/nancy-cushing
John Dargavel, Emeritus Fellow in the Fenner School of Environment and Society at ANU, is so ancient that he fears becoming more a topic than a researcher, but he keeps on trying. After sixty years of forestry, its politics and history, he is now enjoying slowly writing about how we experience the environment in everyday life: dust and dusting, extinctions and sanctuaries, gardens and balconies and theme parks. Whooo!
https://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/dargavel-jb
Andrea Gaynor is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Western Australia, where she researches and teaches environmental history, and welcomes visiting environmental historians! Her current research interests encompass Australia’s southern mallee country, urban water, comparative conservation, urban agriculture, and nature in urban modernity. She is a member of The Beeliar Group: Professors for Environmental Responsibility and edits the A&NZ EHN newsletter and website. http://www.web.uwa.edu.au/person/andrea.gaynor
Tom Griffiths writes and teaches about forests, fire and ice, historical consciousness and heritage, the environmental humanities and the practice of history. His key books are Hunters and Collectors (1996), Forests of Ash (2001), Slicing the Silence: Voyaging to Antarctica (2007) and The Art of Time Travel: Historians and their Craft (2016). He is the W K Hancock Professor of History and Director of the Centre for Environmental History at the Australian National University. For more details, see: https://ceh.environmentalhistory-au-nz.org/people/tomgriffiths/
Astrid Mignon Kirchhof is an Assistant Professor at the Deutsches Museum, Munich working within the collaborative research project History of Nuclear Energy and Society (HoNESt). Previously she was the Volkswagen Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at Georgetown University, USA. From 2010 to 2014, she was a research associate and lecturer at the Chair of Modern and Contemporary History at Humboldt University, Berlin, and the principal investigator of a DFG-research project about nature conservation in East and West Berlin. Forthcoming with UPittPress: Nature Protection and the Iron Curtain. Environmental Policy and Social Movements in Communist and Capitalist Countries 1945-1990, ed. with John McNeill. http://www.astrid-kirchhof.de/en
Katie Holmes is Director of the Centre for the Study of the Inland, La Trobe University, Melbourne. Her work in oral and environmental history seeks to understand the experience of Australian settlement, and integrates gender history, cultural history and literary studies. She is the author of Spaces in Her Day (1995) and Between the Leaves: Stories of Australian women, writing and gardens (2011) and co-author of Reading the Garden: the settlement of Australia (2008). She is currently writing an environmental history of the mallee lands of southern Australia with Andrea Gaynor, Richard Broome and Charles Fahey. http://www.latrobe.edu.au/humanities/about/staff/profile?uname=kbholmes
Jarrod Ray Hore is a PhD candidate in Modern History at Macquarie University, Sydney. His current research focuses on a late nineteenth century nexus between wilderness photography, environmental consciousness, and settler colonialism on the west coast of America, the east coast of Australia and New Zealand. His research interests include settler understandings of landscape; the racial politics of space; and comparative environmental history. Contact: jarrod.hore@mq.edu.au
Rebecca Jones is a historian of climate, environmental change, mental health and rural social issues. She is the author of Slow Catastrophes: Living with Drought in Australia (2017) and Green Harvest: A History of Organic Farming and Gardening in Australia (2010). Rebecca recently completed at postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for Environmental History at ANU and is currently researching the psychological impacts of the Hazelwood Mine Fire at Monash University School of Rural Health. http://rebeccacjones.com/
Janine Kitson has been actively involved in many of NSW’s key environment groups—the National Trust (NSW), Stead Foundation, National Parks Association of NSW, Nature Conservation Council of NSW and the Colong Foundation for Wilderness. Through this involvement Janine has developed a particular passion for the history of the environment movement. Since 2014 Janine has run a series courses on Environmental History at the Workers Educational Association, Sydney.
Catherine Knight is an independent researcher. She has published extensively on topics of New Zealand and Japanese environmental history. She has published two books: Ravaged Beauty: An environmental history of the Manawatu (Dunmore Press, 2014), which won the Sherrard Award for excellence in local and regional history, and New Zealand’s Rivers: An environmental history (Canterbury University Press, 2016). She lives in the Manawatu in New Zealand, where she works as a policy consultant. http://www.catherineknight.nz
George Main works as a curator in the People and Environment program at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra. He is the author of Heartland: the Regeneration of Rural Place (2005), Gunderbooka: a ‘Stone Country’ Story (2000) and The Paddock Report (2012-2016). George is currently working on the development of a new permanent gallery of environmental history, due to open in 2020. http://www.nma.gov.au/history/pate/our_people/george_main
Andrew May is Professor of History at the University of Melbourne, director of the Melbourne History Workshop in the School of Historical & Philosophical Studies, and director of the ongoing Encyclopedia of Melbourne project (emelbourne.net.au). As a social historian he has broad interests across urban, colonial and imperial history. He has published widely on the social experience of the Australian city, its public spaces and communal rituals, its suburban qualities, and its cosmopolitan cultures. He also has an  interest in imperial networks of science, religion and governance. Ongoing projects include a biography of Australian/American entomologist and actor Henry Edwards (1827-1891). https://melbournehistoryworkshop.com/ https://findanexpert.unimelb.edu.au/display/person13351
Daniel May is a PhD candidate in the School of History at the Australian National University, exploring the history of fire within Australia. He is focussing upon the politics of non-Indigenous understandings of Indigenous burning. His research interests include Indigenous history; transnational environmental history; the history and philosophy of science within Australia; and the power of digital media to shape historical consciousness. http://history.cass.anu.edu.au/people/daniel-may
Russell McGregor is an Adjunct Professor of History at James Cook University. His publications include several prize-winning books and numerous articles on the history of representations of Aboriginal people, environmental perspectives on northern Australia and Australian nationalism. He is currently writing a biography of the popular natural history writer and pioneer conservationist, Alec Chisholm. https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/russell.mcgregor/
Julie McIntyre is an ARC Research Fellow at the University of Newcastle. She considers how the growing, making, selling and drinking of wine reveals desire and opportunism in human entanglements with non-human nature. Julie’s research appears in major journals and the award winning First Vintage (2012). Her forthcoming book for NewSouth is on the Hunter Valley wine community and environment, and she is a member of the A&NZ EHN steering committee.
https://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/julie-mcintyre
Ruth Morgan is a Senior Research Fellow in the National Centre for Australian Studies at Monash University, where she holds an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award. She has published widely on the environmental histories of climate and water in urban and rural Australia, including her award-winning book, Running Out? Water in Western Australia (2015). Her current research examines the circulation of climate and hydrological knowledge around the Indian Ocean world during the long nineteenth century. http://profiles.arts.monash.edu.au/ruth-morgan/
K. Jan Oosthoek is an environmental historian based in Brisbane, Australia. His interests include forest history, history of industrial pollution and more recently the transformation of nature in Australia since European settlement. He has also served as vice-president of the European Society for Environmental History (2005–2007) and manages the website “Environmental History Resources” (www.eh-resources.org).
Eric Pawson spent his teaching career at the University of Canterbury, after training in historical geography at Oxford. He chaired the Advisory Committee of the New Zealand Historical Atlas (1997), which piqued his interest in environmental history. A subsequent partnership with Tom Brooking produced books including Seeds of Empire (2011) and Making A New Land (2013). He is now working on futures for post earthquake Christchurch in the Anthropocene. www.geog.canterbury.ac.nz/department/staff/ericp.shtml
Alison Pouliot is an independent researcher and environmental photographer whose work centres around understanding people’s relationships with nature, particularly fungi. Her research spans Australian and Europe and involves a lot of crawling around the forest floor and encouraging others to do so. For more information: http://www.alisonpouliot.com
Kirstie Ross is a history curator at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa where she co-curated the major permanent environmental history exhibition Blood Earth Fire | Whāngai, Whenua, Ahi Kā. The transformation of Aotearoa New Zealand. Her research focusses on popular culture and nature in the 20th century, including outdoor recreation; children, nature and the school curriculum; the creation and use of urban, suburban and national parks; and the role of museums in popularising environmental knowledge. This research has been presented in exhibitions, at conferences, in print, and online for both popular and academic audiences. Contact: kirstier@tepapa.gotvt.nz.
Daniel Rothenburg is interested in the interrelations of environmental change with social transformations, ecological ideas and everyday practices. His research focus is farming communities in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia in the 20th and 21st century and their salinity problems. Especially, he takes a close look at the role of civil society in environmental issues and the connectedness of local, regional, national and global issues, ideas and trends.
https://www.uni-tuebingen.de/en/research/core-research/collaborative-research-centers/sfb-923/staff/doctoral-postdoctoral-researchers/daniel-rothenburg.html
Fiona Williamson is a social and environmental historian based at the National University of Singapore with a particular interest in interactions between climate and society. Her three main research areas explore nature-induced disaster (especially floods), climate change, and the history of meteorology in the British colonies of Malaya and Hong Kong. She also undertakes multi-disciplinary collaborative work recovering historic records to enrich our record of anthropogenic climate change (see http://www.met-acre.net for more). https://ari.nus.edu.sg/Peoples/Detail/1b93aaf2-b886-4a3d-945a-5f74578f443b